David Janes

Toronto, Canada
IOTDB
@dpjanes, @iotdb, www.iotdb.org

David Janes is the founder of IOTDB, open-source software that works around IoT “silos” using semantic descriptions to provide simple and powerful interfaces to everything. For the last six years he's been the president of Discover Anywhere Mobile, making tourism and hospitality apps for destinations around the world. In a previous life he worked at IBM, BMO, CDS and Algorthmics before striking out into the glamorous world of startups.

Talks

Interoperability with Standardless IoT

by David Janes

The Internet of Things is overrun with a plethora of standards: AllJoyn, HomeKit, Thread Group, Open Interconnect Consortium, and many many more.

What these standards have in common is their prescriptive nature: “here’s how you do this”. This is a great model if we all agree on the standard - think HTML! - but an unholy mess if we don’t.

But what if we took the opposite approach, simple describing the capability of things and using that as a jumping off point? Is it possible to create interoperability through descriptive standards? The answer - emphatically - is yes.

This talk will be about how standard web technologies - JSON, JSON-LD, Javascript, Node.JS and RESTful models - can be easily be used to “control all the things”.

We’ve worked with off the shelf components such as WeMo, Hue, SmartThings, TCP Lighting, LIFX; toys like littleBits; prototyping tools like Arduino and Raspberry Pis; protocols like UPnP, mDNS, Bluetooth Low Energy; and even “non-IoT” devices like receivers and television sets.

All code referenced in this talk is open source on GitHub (Apache license).

https://github.com/dpjanes

Slides

Video

We are very sorry, but due to some technical problems we currently couldn't offer a video for this talk.

 

What should a Thing API look like

by David Janes

In the last 15 years, technologists have converged on a simple but powerful model for writing APIs: HTTP, REST, and JSON. The net result is that developers are usually able to pick up new APIs and start getting useful results within minutes.

If we were to use the “API Model” for providing access to Things, what would this look like? This talk walks through real-world examples of what a Thing API should look like, using exactly the same model you would to access any other Internet resource. It outlines some common practical concerns, such as what IDs should be used for Things, how do you differentiate between the “input state” and the “output state” of “real” Things, and how semantics can be added to enable interoperability.

https://github.com/dpjanes

Slides

Video

We are very sorry, but due to some technical problems we currently couldn't offer a video for this talk.